This Made Me Laugh

From here.

DC’s Video Game Comics Sale

Starting on February 21 and running for 4 days is a great sale on heaps of DC Comics’ video game tie-ins. Details below and start shopping here.

Prepare to level up your video game comic book reading experience.

DC Digital Comics is offering a sensational sale on all titles based on some of the best-selling video game franchises of all time.

Journey deeper into madhouse with special tie-in limited series that sets the stage for the critically acclaimed, award-winning sequel to BATMAN: ARKHAM ASYLUM, BATMAN: ARKHAM CITY—including exclusive digital chapters.

Discover the secret history of Ghost from MODERN WARFARE 2; head to battle with Marcus Fenix and Delta Squad in GEARS OF WAR; unleash Hell with the six-issue DANTE’S INFERNO; fight against infection with BSAA Agents Gere and Sugarman in RESIDENT EVIL; and much, much more.

We’ve got 100 video game comic issues to stock your inventory with—all for only .99 cents each! Grab them while you can before we hit the reset button and this sale disappears!

The 4-Day Video Game Comics Sale begins 2/21!

Play the game! Read the comics!

Robot 13 TPB on Kickstarter

I interviewed the talented creative duo of Thomas Hall and Daniel Bradford a while back in the Extra Sequential magazine (pages 74-79 here) and, like many others, have been impressed by their Robot 13 series. Now to get all those issues collected as a Trade Paperback, the guys are looking to Kickstarter.

Find out more about how you can help, and get incentives like groovy buttons, t-shirts and mini-figures right here. This is a great series and I’ve been looking forward to what the guys would come up with next, so here’s hoping this project gives them the opportunity to make that happen, so more people can see how cool Robot 13 is.

 

Pat Grant Interview

My interview with Aussie comics creator Pat Grant is now up at Broken Frontier. Our chat is mainly about his new OGN, Blue which will be released next month. It’s a funny, honest and visually impressive look at xenophobia and youth and is definitely worth picking up.

Read the interview here.

Extra Sequential Podcast #79-Unfinished Projects

51 mins. Advertised, but never released, or completed projects is this show’s focus, and there’s quite a few of them! We also present an unpopular viewpoint on the legal battles of Ghost Rider co-creator Gary Friedrich, and Mladen rails against Kevin Smith’s popular public persona. Also Oasis, Dolly Parton and Doctor Who.

LISTEN TO IT BELOW

DOWNLOAD IT HERE

GET IT ON iTUNES HERE

You can email us at kris (at)extrasequential(dot)com and befriend us on the NEW ES Facebook page.

A brief return to What We’ve Been Reading including Star Wars: Dawn of the Jedi, B.P.R.D: Hell on Earth-The Long Death, and Love and Rockets.

4:45 NEWS

The legal case between Ghost Rider co-creator Gary Friedrich and Marvel, and The Walking Dead battle

DC relaunch sales figures

Kevin Smith’s new Comic Book Men reality TV show

21:05 FEATURE TOPIC – UNFINISHED AND UNRELEASED PROJECTS

Barry Windsor-Smith’s Superman

Alan Moore and Bill Sienkiewicz’s Big Numbers
William S Burroughs’ Ah Pook Is Here!

All Star Wonder Woman by Adam Hughes

Batman: Europa

Kevin Smith’s mass of titles

Image United

Captain America: White by Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale, and Astonishing Captain America

Loeb’s and J. Scott Campbell’s Spider-Man

Bryan Singer’s Ultimate X-Men

Daredevil: End of Days

Jason Boyett Interview

Up now at Christian site, Sight is my interview with writer Jason Boyett about his latest book, Pocket Guide to 2012, which is focused on all the crazy end of the world scenarios and prophets from the last few centuries.

It’s a great book, which you can get here and here is my interview with Boyett.

Tim Daly Interview for Justice League: Doom

On Feb 16 the West Coast Premiere at the Paley Centre takes place, but on Feb 28, Justice League: Doom, the latest animated DC Comics film, will be released on DVD and Blu-Ray. Below is an interview conducted by Warner Bros. with regular Superman voice actor Tim Daly.

The quintessential voice of the Man of Steel – primetime television star Tim Daly – once again returns to his original animated role of Superman in JUSTICE LEAGUE: DOOM, the next entry in the popular, ongoing series of DC Universe Animated Original PG-13 Movies.

Daly set the standard as the voice behind the world’s ultimate super hero for Superman: The Animated Series as well as in several animated movies and video games. While fanboys hail his vocal performance as their point of recognition, the Emmy nominated actor is known well throughout the world for his primetime television series roles, including eight seasons on Wings, an intense recurring role on The Sopranos, a memorable turn on HBO’s landmark mini-series From The Earth To The Moon, and his current ABC hit series, Private Practice.

QUESTION: What’s the crux of JUSTICE LEAGUE: DOOM from Superman’s perspective?

TIM DALY: Well, as usual, it’s all about saving the planet. But first, the Justice League has to save the Justice League. Batman disappoints his colleagues in the Justice League by having a plan to stop any rogue Justice League member, and by allowing those plans to be stolen. Superman understands Batman, though – he really has created these contingency plans for  a pretty noble reason.  He’s trying to protect the world by inserting some checks and balances into this system, realizing that the Justice League has an incredible amount of power, and he wants to make sure that they always use that power in a way that’s not destructive.

QUESTION: Are you able to turn on and off the Superman voice without hesitation, or is there some sort of warm-up involved – mentally or vocally?

TIM DALY: There’s just a lot of technical things to keep in mind. You get warmed up like you do with anything and, after a little rehearsing, it’s all second nature. That doesn’t mean I didn’t want to go back and do a few lines over again – you want these things to be just right. But you don’t necessarily jump straight back in. I mean, it’s not like I walk around being Superman in real life.  But when you read the script and put yourself in the position that Superman is in – I mean, he’s always saving the planet, for God’s sake. When you realize that, it’s not difficult to take the gravitas of the situation and make your voice do what it needs to do.

QUESTION: As well as you know this character after all of these years, are you ever shy to offer suggestions about how certain dialogue might be presented or altered?

TIM DALY: Usually the writing is pretty great, but then again, I can’t keep my mouth shut.  If I think something can be better, I’ll speak up and say so. But I will explain why I’m making the suggestion. I actually find that writers respond very well to being asked questions.  “Why would Superman say that?”  “Would it be better if I said it this way?” You don’t just want to be critical – that doesn’t benefit anyone. The best creative work usually comes from a collaboration.

QUESTION: Have you ever found yourself using the Superman attitude or voice in real life?

TIM DALY: I did a little bit when my kids were young.  And I found that it worked much better on my daughter than my son.  I would say to her, (beefs up his voice), “Stop that right now.” And she would be suitably taken aback. But my son, he didn’t really care.

QUESTION: Has providing the voice of Superman helped you learn anything about yourself or changed you in any way?

TIM DALY: Maybe a little bit.  Maybe some of what gets you through your walks in the world is attitude.  Certainly Superman has a lot of power and he doesn’t have to be showy, rather he carries that confidence quietly.  He knows what he can do. I certainly am not capable of pulling that off in my own life.  But knowing that, I can fake that attitude to help me out now and then.

QUESTION: What Superman memorabilia have you collected over the years?

TIM DALY: I have a beautiful wooden Superman statue with a removable cape – I really love that piece. I have a cel from the original Superman series cartoons.  And I have a gold Superman “S” pin. And then there’s my tights, uh, but don’t tell anymore.

QUESTION: TV and film is usually a one-way experience for you.  You don’t really get to see the final product with an audience very often.  But you’re coming back to the Paley Center in Los Angeles for the premiere of JUSTICE LEAGUE: DOOM – and this will be your second time seeing one of the DC Universe animated movies alongside the fans. What was your experience like watching Superman/Batman: Apocalypse last time?

TIM DALY: It was really great because the fans were so into it.  Fan reaction is really wonderful to experience in person, especially fans of this genre. They’re so passionate. And it was also fun because it was just my voice and Superman’s image.  Usually when I see myself in a film or on television, there’s about a six-month period where I can’t look at it because all I’ll see are the mistakes. I’m just appalled by the person that I see.  The camera sees me from angles that I’ve never seen myself, so I never think it’s me.  I look at that and I think, “My God, that’s me.” But with these films, I can look up and it is Superman on the screen.  So I don’t have to go through all that. He has no flaws.

QUESTION: What’s the magic of working with dialogue director Andrea Romano?

TIM DALY: The great thing about working with Andrea is that she loves it so much, and she’s so positive about it.  You can’t fake that.  Even after all this time, doing 41 shows at a time, all the series and films, she’s right there with the same enthusiasm and love for the material. I don’t know how she keeps it all straight. Plus, she really loves actors – you always feel like she’s rooting for you.  And that makes it very easy.